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Beware the Dangers of Christmas: Women Must Protect their Children from the Dangers in the Christmas Holidays
Image © Austin Cline
Original Poster: Library of Congress

Christians and even most non-Christians typically regard Christmas as being at least innocuous if not a positive good. This opinion is not universally shared, though. Some are critical of Christmas, arguing that it has more negative aspects than positive ones - or even that there's nothing especially positive about it at all.

Read Article: Beware the Dangers of Christmas: Women Must Protect their Children from the Dangers in the Christmas Holidays

Comments
December 9, 2008 at 2:00 am
(1) Pete Seeker says:

I’m not the least offended by nothing.

For that reason, unlike many of my fellow atheists, I have no qualms with religious observations. What’s more, I plan to participate in upcoming Christmas activities.

I have a Christmas tree, appreciate the folk music we call “carols,” and — who knows? — I may even sing along.

Anathema? Hardly.

Religion, after all, is a naturally occurring phenomenon that is uniquely human. To deny religion is to deny a benign but useful work of nature. (While a duck may be fooled by a decoy, people have the amazing capacity to believe stuff they, themselves, imagine. Incredible!)

Think about it. When you embrace a good work of fiction — Gone With The Wind, for example — you are experiencing a work of natural; that marvelous element of human imagination that produced life-like characters and their circumstances in our minds.

And few atheists would deny their children a moment on Santa’s knee simply because we know he is a fictional afterthought of an historical religious personality.

So why should be not celebrate Christmas from a perspective of human understanding? The realization that religious notions are nature’s way of allowing the human mind to grapple with life’s uncertainties?

Granted, I won’t be reciting Rhett Butler as an historical figure, nor will I be penning a note to Santa. Ask me to pray for Christmas dinner and be prepared for a moment of silence instead.

In short, atheists need to “chill out” when it comes to religious celebrations. Join in the fun. Participate. And enjoy the creative gift of imagination that nature has bestowed upon our species.

http://www.peteseeker.com

November 23, 2011 at 8:04 am
(2) Grandpa_In_The_East says:

peteseeker,

“I’m not the least offended by nothing.”

You should not use a double negative.

Grandpa

December 9, 2008 at 2:01 am
(3) Pete Seeker says:

I’m not the least offended by nothing.

For that reason, unlike many of my fellow atheists, I have no qualms with religious observations. What’s more, I plan to participate in upcoming Christmas activities.

I have a Christmas tree, appreciate the folk music we call “carols,” and — who knows? — I may even sing along.

Anathema? Hardly.

Religion, after all, is a naturally occurring phenomenon that is uniquely human. To deny religion is to deny a benign but useful work of nature. (While a duck may be fooled by a decoy, people have the amazing capacity to believe stuff they, themselves, imagine. Incredible!)

Think about it. When you embrace a good work of fiction — Gone With The Wind, for example — you are experiencing a work of natural; that marvelous element of human imagination that produced life-like characters and their circumstances in our minds.

And few atheists would deny their children a moment on Santa’s knee simply because we know he is a fictional afterthought of an historical religious personality.

So why should be not celebrate Christmas from a perspective of human understanding? The realization that religious notions are nature’s way of allowing the human mind to grapple with life’s uncertainties?

Granted, I won’t be reciting Rhett Butler as an historical figure, nor will I be penning a note to Santa. Ask me to pray for Christmas dinner and be prepared for a moment of silence instead.

In short, atheists need to “chill out” when it comes to religious celebrations. Join in the fun. Participate. And enjoy the creative gift of imagination that nature has bestowed upon our species.

November 23, 2011 at 8:05 am
(4) Grandpa_In_The_East says:

Pete Seeker,

“I’m not the least offended by nothing.”

You should not use a double negative.

Grandpa

December 9, 2008 at 6:07 pm
(5) Pujjuut says:

G’day Pete Seeker, many atheists who visit this site and post here do not need to “chill out” about celebrating christmas.

http://atheism.about.com/b/2008/11/19/discussion-is-merry-christmas-offensive.htm

December 8, 2013 at 9:29 am
(6) Jeanne says:

This so-called “War on Christmas” is nothing more than trumped up nonsense, unless, of course, not getting preferential treatment is persecution.

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