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Austin Cline

Kirk Cameron: Christian Reconstructionist

By April 16, 2012

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Kirk Cameron, CPAC 2012
Kirk Cameron
CPAC 2012
Win McNamee / Getty

Well known for his promotion of creationism and conservative evangelical Christianity, Kirk Cameron has started moving quietly into the realm of Christian Reconstructionism. At no point does he explicitly endorse Dominion Theology or any of the worst aspects of it (like executing gays), but he is promoting the fundamental principles of Dominion Theology.

This will likely lead to more people buying into it without realizing what sort of fascist, oppressive religious system they are adopting.

Julie Ingersoll explains that there are three important theological principles which lie behind Christian Reconstructionism:

Presuppositionalism stipulates that all knowledge is understood to begin with the acceptance of unprovable assumptions. For Reconstructionists only two, mutually exclusive, starting points are possible: the true sovereignty and authority of the god of the Bible or the false claim of the supremacy of human reason. This point has found a voice in the ubiquitous critique of "secular humanism" and the argument that religious neutrality is impossible.

Postmillennialism, an end-times theology that challenges contemporary rapture theology, claims that the kingdom of God was established at the resurrection and is being realized as Christianity spreads across the world through the exercise of dominion. Its popularized versions are "dominion theology" and the effort to "restore America's foundation" as a "Christian nation."

Theonomy is the view that all law must be based in God's law, which is to say biblical law. Reconstructionists look to ancient Israel as the model for society and to the Puritans as an exemplar of the modern application of biblical law. They argue for a distinction between theonomy and the more commonly used theocracy on the basis of what they claim is a biblical division of earthly authority set forth by God.

Source: Religion Dispatches

Kirk Cameron has been expounding all three:

On David Barton's Wallbuilders Live (listen here), Cameron embraced presuppositionalism, the myth of neutrality and the inescapability of authority: faith is always involved in politics, even those who are secular humanists, they are importing their secular humanist faith and religion and morality and imposing it on everybody else through the laws that they make. So the idea of faith in government is inescapable; it's always going to be somebody's faith, even if it's faith in atheism.

At the Vision Forum's SAICF Cameron ridiculed premillennialism, sounding distinctly postmillennial: Their attitude (the Puritans) was not 'uh-oh the beast and the Antichrist is here... let's just keep our heads down and wait for the end of the world.' Instead they said, 'Let's make a 500-year plan and go start a nation....'

And in Christianity Today he connected American history to ancient Israel and biblical law: The true roots of America go all the way back to the ancient Hebrew republic. You can trace those roots at Jamestown back to Europe as well. This is the trail of freedom that leads us all the way back to the ancient Hebrews under Moses where he first delivered those laws of liberty--when he told them to elect leaders, men of character that you willingly submit yourself to, to self-govern rather than have a king.

When people talk about Dominion Theology and Christian Reconstructionism, they usually focus on the worst aspects -- slavery, stoning people, etc. Those topics are worth addressing, but even more important are the principles, ideas, and assumptions which are essential in shaping Dominion Theology and which some Christians are spreading in order to shape various political, social, cultural, and economic debates.

When these ideas are promoted independent of Dominion Theology, they provide a means for that theology to influence politics and culture without people realizing it. They also provide a means for others to start adopting that theology, bit by bit, without realizing where the road is leading them. There's lots of room for "plausible deniability" should anyone ask about the extremism, but there's no doubt that violent extremism is the end product of what Kirk Cameron is selling.

Comments
April 21, 2012 at 5:18 pm
(1) d young says:

Just more NAZIS in Christian clothes!

Those GUILTY of SEDITION need to be executed, that simple!

February 27, 2014 at 8:10 am
(2) Karen says:

Nazi aetheists! Wanting to execute people who don’t think like them. I am PRO GOD and His Word. You are not.

I’ll let God be the judge.

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